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  #11  
Old 06-08-2022, 01:55 AM
thekriebles thekriebles is offline
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Awesome photography; always enjoy your posts!
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  #12  
Old 06-08-2022, 02:08 AM
Rick in Oregon Rick in Oregon is offline
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Thanks you guys. Good to know others share the same passion. I appreciate the kind words.

Another shot from that same day. They're all getting fat now with good spring moisture and plenty of fresh buds to munch.



It's amazing the strength these critters have in regard to being able to literally rearrange large lava rock boulders over a foot square, to accommodate their den building efforts when needed. Like mini rock grizzlies.
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  #13  
Old 06-08-2022, 04:01 AM
JDHasty JDHasty is offline
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Hi Rick,

Iím curious what kind of camera are you using?

I bought a Coolpix P600 that has 60X Optical Zoom and then internal ďdigital zoomĒ to enjoy with my kids and it does a decent job, but have been thinking of getting a nice digital camera. Actually, for what it is the P600 is not bad, but itís slow. Even so, we have been able to get some fairly decent wildlife photos using it.

I still have an FE2, F3 and Nikormat, but havenít used them since my kids were born. I used to at least handle a camera almost daily (more often than not an FE2), and about half the time take a few photos. I donít even know where to purchase film these days. I had a 300 F2.8 that got stolen, along with another FE2 and an F4. That lens was a lot to pack around, but still a personal favorite of mine. I still have quite a few lenses, bellows, Speed Lights, ring lights, motor drives and also have a Bronica setup. Perhaps some day I will get back into shooting film cameras.

Now that my kids are getting a bit older I have been toying with the idea of getting a nice digital camera, but havenít put much time or effort into that yet.
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  #14  
Old 06-08-2022, 11:54 AM
Kiwishooter Kiwishooter is offline
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I really like this photo Rick, what camera and 300mm lens were you using?



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  #15  
Old 06-08-2022, 05:07 PM
Rick in Oregon Rick in Oregon is offline
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JD and Kiwi, I'm using a Nikon D3300 DSLR with Nikon lens. The telephoto I used for the chuck pics is their AF 70-300mm DX. I gave up on digital zoom too, much preferring optical, as digital zoom always degrades the pic quality as you pump up the zoom value.

Like you JD, I've still got my old film camera, a Minolta X700 w/motor drive and a full set of lenses that I never use any more. No one sells film now, you can't find a place to develop it, let alone process slides any more. So now for me at least, it's all digital....easy to do post production compared to film and one h3ll of alot cheaper too. Maybe some day in the future our old film cameras will be like a "cool old find". Maybe.

Just for fun, here's a couple of a young buck that was wandering about the rock cliffs while I was taking pics of chucks. He was just moseying about nibbling the spring buds that were handy.



He would stop at all the low overhanging branches for a nibble, then move on to the next tasty morsel. I didn't want to discharge my rifle while he was close, sure didn't want to scare the little guy away.



I never know what critters I'll encounter while out in the sage and junipers sneaking about for rockchucks. But as our local paper had the below headline recently, it shows we have no shortage of them around here....



For me, it's the perfect place to live.....especially if you have an accurate rifle!
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  #16  
Old 06-08-2022, 05:29 PM
JDHasty JDHasty is offline
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Riddled with Rockchucks, that I can relate to.

We shoot one location that is absolutely overrun, but the locals won't grant anyone else except locals access. We shot ~275 in two days there a few weeks ago. They even move the cattle around to accommodate our shooting. Riddled is no exaggeration, a woman went chest deep in the middle of a hay meadow that had been plowed and had an extensive series of burroughs out in the middle of it. W/o the turf to hold the surface together it just swallowed her up. The locals pretty much shotgun the dumb ones early on and educate the rest of them. Then they blast away at them with 10/22s and keep them on their toes.

We haven't put near the hurtin on them as we have in other years due to the weather, Global Warming I guess. The corn won't germinate unless it is 55 degrees and it was just an inch and a half tall three weeks ago. It should have been a foot and a half or two feet tall by then.

We were invited to take care of an infestation of pea fowl about twenty five years ago. I was in Casshmere, home of L.E. Wilson, and was chatting up the mayor of a small town up the road when he mentioned that peacocks had been driving the entire town mad. I told him that a buddy and I could fix that problem with out Beeman air rifles. Boy, that was a hoot. A peacock makes for pretty good table fare too.

Last edited by JDHasty; 06-08-2022 at 05:41 PM.
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  #17  
Old 06-08-2022, 05:42 PM
Screaminweasil Screaminweasil is offline
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Very nice outing Rick. Great pictures!


Austin
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  #18  
Old 06-08-2022, 06:19 PM
Bayou City Boy Bayou City Boy is offline
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Nice pictures, Rick.

My wife is a professional photographer who moved from film to digital cameras maybe 20 years ago. Much easier to deal with after the shutter opens and closes, and the quality of digital cameras today is in a world all of its own.

She once used some high dollar, advanced film cameras, and she hasn't looked back since switching. Some progress is positive.........

btw - be careful out there, Rick. We'd hate to hear that you've disappeared/been swept under while out there hunting rock chucks.

-BCB
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Last edited by Bayou City Boy; 06-08-2022 at 10:44 PM.
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  #19  
Old 06-08-2022, 07:24 PM
Rick in Oregon Rick in Oregon is offline
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Thanks Hal. I'm certain your wife is in a different category than I am, me being an amateur n' all. But thanks for the comment. I'm just tryin' to have some fun.

"btw - be careful out there, Rick. We'd hate to hear that you've disappeared/been swept under while out there hunting rock chucks."

Believe me, I AM careful out there in the rocks. Being solidly into "Geezerhood", falling down into that stuff is to be avoided at all costs, and taking a spill down into stuff like this below is NOT on the agenda. I've already got too many aftermarket parts holding me together. A fellow veteran once told me "we've got enough titanium in us to build an F-15". Shooting chucks in this environment is not hard, it's retrieving them is when it gets interesting.



Other than rockchucks, rattlesnakes, eagle and hawk nests, some of those small caves and crevices sometimes yield some cool obsidian arrowheads and flakes where someone sought shelter a very long time ago.
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  #20  
Old 06-08-2022, 08:11 PM
JDHasty JDHasty is offline
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That combination you are using is really attractive to me. The 300 F2.8 I had was a big clunky thing, but it could not be beat for wildlife photography back then. I got it from a newspaper that went bust and still paid twice what the lens you are using costs today. They used it for photographing sporting events. To go with what you have and only lose half a stop, plus have zoom down to 70 would be a huge improvement.

I toted it and an FE2 around in a backpack and looking back it remember thinking that by the end of a day weighed as much as a truck transmission.

Last edited by JDHasty; 06-08-2022 at 08:14 PM.
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