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  #11  
Old 09-03-2022, 11:30 PM
rider rider is offline
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Default light rifles

Foxhunter,
I have a Montana in .243. I have at times done everything consistent and achieved respectable three shot groups. It seems to me that the light rifle is very finicky from a handling aspect. However in the field it has performed very well on Whitetail deer. I have read that a softer front rest can help with the verticle stringing in lite rifles. I have not been able to confirm that theory.
I don't know what your experience is with the Montana carbon fiber stock but it seems to absorb the recoil more than say a 700 with a wood stock.
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  #12  
Old 09-04-2022, 01:06 AM
JDHasty JDHasty is offline
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I donít know, Iíve never gotten there. My 17 Remington Ultra Wildcat in MPI stock is very light and shoots very tight groups. Probably under five lbs stripped and about 5.5 with Leupold 2-7 Compact.
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  #13  
Old 09-04-2022, 01:44 AM
Herb in Pa Herb in Pa is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rider View Post
Foxhunter,
I have a Montana in .243. I have at times done everything consistent and achieved respectable three shot groups. It seems to me that the light rifle is very finicky from a handling aspect. However in the field it has performed very well on Whitetail deer. I have read that a softer front rest can help with the verticle stringing in lite rifles. I have not been able to confirm that theory.
I don't know what your experience is with the Montana carbon fiber stock but it seems to absorb the recoil more than say a 700 with a wood stock.
I had a similar experience with my Montana in .243 also
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  #14  
Old 09-04-2022, 01:52 AM
bcp bcp is offline
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One of the easy and common ways to reduce weight is a short, thin barrel. This makes it harder to keep the muzzle steady.



If most of the weight reduction is in the stock and action, and with a more normal size barrel, the rifle will not be so muzzle light.


Bruce
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  #15  
Old 09-04-2022, 06:07 AM
georgeld georgeld is offline
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I'm just the opposite.
I don't want a real light rifle.

Nearly all mine are at least 9#, several 11#
and this cannon .358RUM I had built is an even 15# with 5 rounds.
And it still kicks worse than a mad mule. It has a 1lb and a 13oz mercury
in it, the pad is 2" wide, 7" tall.

I don't want to be around a brake, I wouldn't have a gun with one if
it was given to me.

I've teased many others over the years when they said my hunting
rifle was too heavy.
"Hell, I like 'em that way, when my knuckles start dragging on the ground
I just change hands". After getting a sling caught on a snag sneaking up
for a shot at a bull elk and landing on my butt, it went in the brush.
I don't even want a back stud on my stocks. Front one only to use a bipod with.
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Last edited by georgeld; 09-04-2022 at 06:09 AM. Reason: sorting
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  #16  
Old 09-04-2022, 04:11 PM
JDHasty JDHasty is offline
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My little Ithaca 37 20 has one of three 25 inch Ultra Featherlight barrels on it when I am in the field. Word on the street is a shotgun that muzzle light cannot be good. I prefer it to an aluminum frame Ultra Featherlight, but Ithaca did mill some of the steel off the sides of the receiver and re roll the game scenes on it. It suits me well enough that when I qualified with shotgun in the Master Hunter program I shot a round of 16 yard trap with it and scored 23.

My Kimber Mini Classic is tiny and light. I won my share of Hunter Class Smallbore Silhouette matches at Pee Ell shooting against nationally ranked shooters shooting it. I could have used a 541S or 52C Sporter if I felt like it and not given up any accuracy or trigger. They make weight.

For a field gun the too light to hold steady or swing smoothly rhetoric makes a lot of sense, a lot of nonsense. Shoot it enough that it becomes part of you and light doesnít matter much to me. YMMV.
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  #17  
Old 09-05-2022, 06:40 AM
georgeld georgeld is offline
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My first shotgun was a Ithica M 37 with a Poly Choke on it.' I never did
get where I could hit the inside of the barn with it. Stock was too short to start with.'
Dad got pretty good with it on ducks. I sold it this summer to a friend's son
for $300, & gave the kid five boxes of reloads.

Second one was a 4 lb single 3" mag. I lived in a pup tent at a lake and shot my 5 mallard drakes every day with 5 shots. After the first week of that torture I never missed a shot for over three months. Quite often I made what the other guys on the firing line swore was 70 yard shots. I used 3" #2 lead in those days. When they'd comment on how I never missed. I'd tell them: "shooting this kicking sob I sure don't want to have to make a 6th shot!" My shoulder hurt so bad I almost cried at each shot. I let them all shoot first, when the ducks kept flying then I'd shoot so nearly all my shots were long. That gives the shot a chance to spread. I had just split with the wife and needed to get away, and would have stayed longer but, Uncle Sam was calling. Re: Jan '71

A couple years later I bought a like new used M 1100 with a turkey barrel and did just as well with it. Paid $240 for it at a Denver gun range store. Still have it. May? '73.
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Last edited by georgeld; 09-05-2022 at 06:43 AM.
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  #18  
Old 09-05-2022, 08:03 PM
Eagle_view Eagle_view is offline
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I once had an1891 Argentine cavalry carbine. It weighed about the same as a light Win 94 carbine but shot the 7.65 Mauser. It rode in a saddle scabbard on the inside of the driver's door of my '74 ford pickup. I could sometimes pick up a coyote or deer with it, but it sure slapped your shoulder blades together. We usually shot Norma 184 grain ammo at about 2300 fps out of that short barrel. It was loud and kicked hard but worth having around. I sold it while going to Wa. State Univ.
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  #19  
Old 09-06-2022, 12:35 PM
Gerald D. Gerald D. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle_view View Post
I once had an1891 Argentine cavalry carbine. It weighed about the same as a light Win 94 carbine but shot the 7.65 Mauser. It rode in a saddle scabbard on the inside of the driver's door of my '74 ford pickup. I could sometimes pick up a coyote or deer with it, but it sure slapped your shoulder blades together. We usually shot Norma 184 grain ammo at about 2300 fps out of that short barrel. It was loud and kicked hard but worth having around. I sold it while going to Wa. State Univ.
My first centerfire rifle was a 1891 Cavalry Carbine, a poor Sgt. in the Air Force it was all I could afford, yeah it kicked for sure and the steel butt plate didn't help either.
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