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  #11  
Old 10-30-2021, 03:32 PM
Dean2 Dean2 is offline
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If you have a gun smith in town I would go there if I didn't want to buy a gauge set. Personally, I have go and no-go for all the cartridges I shoot. Small investment and amazing how often you actually use them when you have them. I take no-gos and a Teslong to gun shows. You would be amazed at how many guns are for sale, hardly ever been shot, but excess head space and major barrel wear.
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  #12  
Old 10-30-2021, 04:49 PM
K22 K22 is offline
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I checked the headspacing with electrical tape which mic'd at .0075. The first rifle, a Kimber Montana would not allow the bolt to close, well actually, I stopped immediately when trying to close it, but I could force it closed since it was tape. Put a new piece of electrical tape on the same FL sized brass and tried the problem child, which is a Kimber Longmaster Classic. It closed rather easily. Ok, hhmmm, lets go with 2 pieces of electrical tape. A slight bit of resistant, but it closed without much effort. So the bolt will close with .015 of tape on the brass.
I'm thinking, not good.
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  #13  
Old 11-02-2021, 05:29 PM
Daryl Daryl is offline
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That's a mite loose, imho. There would have been some compression due to the cam action of the bolt, but likely not more than 3 thou. if it was still easy.
I thought SAAMI was .006" over minimum and CIP was .007" Those might be reversed.
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Last edited by Daryl; 11-02-2021 at 05:32 PM.
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  #14  
Old 11-02-2021, 06:12 PM
TinMan TinMan is offline
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FYI, I posted the dimensions on #10 of this post. The SAAMI drawing. The relevant dimensions are 1.4636"-1.4736". You might be remembering taht the NATO chamber is 0.006" above minimum.

Last edited by TinMan; 11-02-2021 at 06:13 PM. Reason: typo
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  #15  
Old 11-04-2021, 08:39 AM
K22 K22 is offline
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A member was very kind to loan me a no go gauge, which I will use as soon as I get a chance, hopefully this Fri.
I've never used one before so this will be a new experience.
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  #16  
Old 11-05-2021, 12:12 AM
K22 K22 is offline
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Was able to find time to check the headspace this evening with the no go gauge and discovered the headspacing was fine. Very close if not the same as the other 223 I shoot. After checking the one I was suspicious of I checked the other rifle and both checks appeared to be same.
Thanks to all for the advice and help.
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  #17  
Old 11-05-2021, 02:16 PM
flyrod flyrod is offline
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Since 223 is a factory round, you can also just measure a factory new round before and after firing to get an idea how much the case is expanding. There are different ways to do this, but something easy is to use another fired case, inverted so that it touches the shoulder of the case you want to measure. So for 223, any 30cal case would work. Make sure the primers on the fired case(s) are flush or below flush, and that the 30cal case mouth is not dented. You could even give it a light chamfer to make sure the mouth is smooth and round. Then stick the 30cal case over the 223 round and measure the total length, and write it down. Then fire the 223 and repeat the measurement (again, make sure the primers on the fired case(s) are flush or below flush).

This "tool" for measuring the position of the shoulder also works to adjust sizing dies to set the shoulder back in a consistent way. I have a 9mm luger case set aside that I use for measuring larger rifles cases.
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  #18  
Old 11-05-2021, 10:23 PM
K22 K22 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyrod View Post
Since 223 is a factory round, you can also just measure a factory new round before and after firing to get an idea how much the case is expanding. There are different ways to do this, but something easy is to use another fired case, inverted so that it touches the shoulder of the case you want to measure. So for 223, any 30cal case would work. Make sure the primers on the fired case(s) are flush or below flush, and that the 30cal case mouth is not dented. You could even give it a light chamfer to make sure the mouth is smooth and round. Then stick the 30cal case over the 223 round and measure the total length, and write it down. Then fire the 223 and repeat the measurement (again, make sure the primers on the fired case(s) are flush or below flush).

This "tool" for measuring the position of the shoulder also works to adjust sizing dies to set the shoulder back in a consistent way. I have a 9mm luger case set aside that I use for measuring larger rifles cases.
This is great information to have. Another reason I love this website.
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  #19  
Old 11-05-2021, 10:40 PM
TinMan TinMan is offline
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You might try Brownell's to find a tool that used to be nicknamed a 'Sinclair Nut' that was made by Sinclair's before Brownell's bought them out. It looks like a big hex nut that has different bullet sized holes on each of the 6 faces. You use it with a caliper to measure the length of seated bullets to check chamber touching or freebore. They also make one to use for measuring the case length, just like you are trying to do now.

https://www.brownells.com/reloading/...prod83792.aspx

Last edited by TinMan; 11-05-2021 at 10:45 PM. Reason: added info
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  #20  
Old 11-06-2021, 12:02 AM
Kiwishooter Kiwishooter is offline
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I've found the best tool for taking measurments of case head to shoulder is the Hornady Headspace set. https://www.hornady.com/headspace-bushings#!/

With this set and a set of calipers I can measure any case and compare it to any other case, no matter if the case is loaded or not.

While I do have a dedicated depriming die, I also took a Hornady base anvil, which I put in the lathe and turned a 30thou deep pocket that will accommodate protruding primers that way it doesn't matter if I can't remove the primer.

I take this to the range and have found it very handy when others have problems.

Kiwi
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