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Old 05-05-2017, 05:31 PM
260Ackley 260Ackley is offline
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Default Bulk 223 reloading

I know this has been detailed before but the search function doesn't work and I tried to Google it with saubier and nothing came up. Can anyone link a thread detailing their strategy for bulk rifle ammo reloading on a progressive press. I reload everything already but have yet to do bulk rifle. Looking for time saving strategies. Do you deprime on a single stage trim and deburr and work out the crimp then go to the progressive press. This is plinking ammo only. Any advice would be great. Looking to save time and energy. I've been having back and neck issues and find the time I'm not in pain to be precious and would like to use it as wisely as I can.
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Old 05-05-2017, 05:47 PM
Bill K Bill K is offline
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Default Bulk 223 reloading

Think you will find feeding and lack of malfunctions with the progressive press's all work best, by have you brass all de-crimped, trimmed and camfered, prior to feeding into the progressive. Takes some time, I know, but use your single stage for initial sizing and de-crimping ( I use the RCSB de-crimp die) and have it set too go. Just my thoughts. Bill K
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Old 05-05-2017, 07:23 PM
Teancum1 Teancum1 is offline
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Default Prep > Load

I agree with Bill K. You have to do all your case prep first. That can be minimal or extensive with primer pocket clean, debur, trim, chamfer, lube, etc. If you are going to prep a lot of cases, you might look at one of those case prep stations that can do a lot of it for you. Once that is done, a progressive press can be very quick. There are some tricks that can make it even easier. I use a Redding S-type bushing die with the carbide bushing and carbide sizer button on my 20VT. I come back from shooting, I can polish them or not, but I don't even have to lube them - they can go from the range or field right back onto the press. I set my headspace to virgin cases formed in a 17 fireball body die, and I've never had to trim with over 8 reloading cycles on them.
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Old 05-05-2017, 09:33 PM
dungheap dungheap is offline
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If I were going to do that, I'd tumble the cases, check 'em with a caliper to sort out the ones that NEED trimming, full length size, wash 'n' dry, and then run 'em through the progressive. That would be the minimum IMO.

I've never done them on a progressive, but those prelimary steps have worked for me for a whole lot of ammo loaded for the AR-15 over time, I just continue by priming, charge in loading blocks, seat and taper crimp in a single stage press. Either way ought to work.
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Old 05-05-2017, 11:24 PM
Gary in Illinois Gary in Illinois is offline
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Default Confession time...

After years of telling myself that my RCBS progressive press was as good as it gets, I finally tried a Dillon. There really isn't much of a comparison.

I bought a Dillon 650 with a case feeder and no longer dread long reloading sessions with bottlenecked cases. I start with relatively clean cases that are still primed. I found a key timesaving tip in a You Tube video that I wish I could take credit for, but can't.

When you dump your cases into the case feeder throw in 6 - 10 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" cubes of foam rubber that have had each side rubbed with Imperial size lube. The rotating action of the case feeder will apply enough lube for full length sizing and not so much that the cases require much (if any) cleanup after loading. Lubing and cleanup had always been a big problem for me with progressive presses!

Using this method, I can perform ALL reloading operations on the progressive press. The priming system (my other progressive press problem!) on the Dillon is fast, reliable and accurate. I deprime, resize, prime, charge, seat and crimp all without touching the cases.

So, I will say it again; I have been wrong for years about the Dillon progressive presses. There! Happy?

I will probably sleep MUCH better tonight now.
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Old 05-05-2017, 11:25 PM
snowpro440 snowpro440 is offline
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Read some loading books.........

Last edited by snowpro440; 05-06-2017 at 06:00 PM.
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Old 05-06-2017, 12:27 AM
AzSam AzSam is offline
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Hi there.
This is my preference. May not be the fastest, but it works for me. I clean my cases, then size on my single stage, followed by tossing them a tumbler with plain untreated corn cob media and let the tumbler remove the lube. Naturally any other prep work- trimming, primer crimps dealt with, will need be done somewhere along way and make sure all the media is out of case and flash hole. (I usually do all this right after they are shot so they are all ready to load when time comes) Once all prep work is done I run them through the Dillon.
All the best.
Michael.

Last edited by AzSam; 05-06-2017 at 01:00 AM.
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Old 05-06-2017, 12:44 AM
TinMan TinMan is offline
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For AR bulk ammo, I use the Dillon as a pistol press, FS using Hornady One Shot for lube. For my bolt action rifles, the brass is segregated by rifle and is deprimed and neck sized in a single stage press. That brass is then primed in the Dillon and used as a progressive for the rest of the operations (but not sized as a progressive). Case prep work like decrimp, deprime, flash hole deburring and trim are done before they get loaded.
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Old 05-06-2017, 04:31 AM
georgeld georgeld is offline
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Default

Ha!

I do everything on a single stage press. Reloading is one of my
many hobbies, so that's just part of the deal. I get 'em all ready
and primed first, then start loading.

I just got the shell plate for one of Lee's 1000 to fit .223's, 30 carb, '40, 38's
and have a five gallon bucket of each except the .223's are in short supply again now. I had 7000 loaded til "a friend" helped himself to them while I was laid. Now I need more brass.
Continous circle it seems!

have fun, when done, tell us about it.
Good luck with that neck and back. Am in the middle of the back
problems again now, been there twice so far.
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Old 05-06-2017, 03:02 PM
260Ackley 260Ackley is offline
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Thanks for the tips guys. I was leaning towards many of your methods and you confirmed my thoughts. I have a few thousand 9mm to make then the 223s turn. I recently got a second lee loadmaster. I will leave one set up in 9mm and change the other over for other calibers. They have their quirks. You are either singing it's praises when it works or cursing it's many "quirks". It tought me some trouble shooting skills and keeps my mechanical abilities sharp. I can't afford a Dillon so please dont bludgeon me with the blue machine.
A chiropractor is helping with my back. But as he worked on my back he tweaked my neck and it started up again. One day at a time. I'm learning to enjoy good health when I have it and be thankful for it.
If anyone else has any enlightening ideas on bulk loading let me know. Thanks
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