Saubier.com  



Go Back   Saubier.com > Saubier.com Forums > Small Caliber Discussion Board

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-19-2016, 01:21 AM
Dooger Dooger is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 234
Default Leupold VX-2 4-12x40 for 221 FB

Thinking about getting this scope for a CZ 527 American. Wondering if I really need the AO on this gun??? Most shots will be under 200, but may reach out to 300 on an occasional coyote, crow or chuck.

Suggestions?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-19-2016, 01:33 AM
trotterlg trotterlg is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,108
Default

Even without the AO you can set the parallax to anything you like, so if your average is 150 yards you can set it to zero there. Larry
__________________
A gun is just like a parachute, if you really need one, nothing else will do.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-19-2016, 02:45 AM
L Cazador L Cazador is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 232
Default Leup ?

That depends if you wear glasses or contacts, then you'll need an AO to tune the image in.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-19-2016, 03:46 AM
trotterlg trotterlg is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,108
Default

If you remove the lock ring at the front of a non AO scope and turn the objective in or out it is exactly the same as turning the AO ring on the outside of an AO scope. Larry
__________________
A gun is just like a parachute, if you really need one, nothing else will do.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-19-2016, 04:01 AM
NeilA. NeilA. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Western Washington
Posts: 278
Default

Sorry for the maybe stupid question Larry, but, do you mean the lock ring just behind the power adjustment ring? and then would you focus at a distance you would want it adjusted to?

Neil
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-19-2016, 06:18 AM
trotterlg trotterlg is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,108
Default

No, at the front of the scope there is a ring, it is the outside of the scope and has threads on the inside. It screws onto the objective carrier and locks it in place when you tighten it down. If you take it off you can screw the objective carrier in and out of the scope body to adjust the parallax distance. Larry
__________________
A gun is just like a parachute, if you really need one, nothing else will do.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-20-2016, 03:34 AM
GrocMax GrocMax is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: McKinney TX
Posts: 437
Default

Side AO/focus is a must for me PD'ing. Front AO is just a pain. Shorter distances below 400 yds is where you need the AO.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-20-2016, 06:38 AM
trotterlg trotterlg is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,108
Default

Really focus and parallax are different things. Focus gets things sharp and the parallax corrects for POI shift with eye position looking through the scope. Parallax is more evident at closer ranges, beyond about 150 yards or so there isn't much to adjust, probably why most AO scopes go from 200 yards to infinity in about 1/16 inch of travel on the AO dial. Larry
__________________
A gun is just like a parachute, if you really need one, nothing else will do.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-20-2016, 03:32 PM
drover drover is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 186
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dooger View Post
Thinking about getting this scope for a CZ 527 American. Wondering if I really need the AO on this gun??? Most shots will be under 200, but may reach out to 300 on an occasional coyote, crow or chuck.

Suggestions?
Short answer - NO.

Centerfire scopes are generally set to be parallax free at 150 - 175 yds. If it is a concern to you call Leupold and they can tell you where they set parallax on that particular scope.
Even if it has a bit of parallax it will not be enough to cause you to miss a crow, rockchuck or coyote at those ranges.

Another way around parallax is to position your eye behind the scope at the same place for each shot. I have a 4-12 Redfield that has almost an inch of parallax at 100 yds but I can still shoot 1/2" groups with it by making sure to position my head the same each time.

Parallax is easy to check - put your scope, or rifle with scope mounted, in a solid mount (even a cardboard box with V-slots cut in it will work) look at a target with a one inch square on it at 100 yds then without touching the rifle, or scope, with your head about the same distance as it would be when shooting, move your head slightly and you will see the crosshairs appear to move. This will give you an idea of them amount of parallax at that distance. This of course will work at any distance but 100 yds is easiest to get an idea of the amount of parralax - for me anyway.

drover
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-20-2016, 06:43 PM
GrocMax GrocMax is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: McKinney TX
Posts: 437
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterlg View Post
Really focus and parallax are different things. Focus gets things sharp and the parallax corrects for POI shift with eye position looking through the scope. Parallax is more evident at closer ranges, beyond about 150 yards or so there isn't much to adjust, probably why most AO scopes go from 200 yards to infinity in about 1/16 inch of travel on the AO dial. Larry
Why I strongly prefer the side AO for PD's, you're constantly adjusting due to the frequent changes in range from 50-300 yds.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.