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  #1  
Old 01-31-2020, 10:12 PM
Kiwishooter Kiwishooter is offline
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Default Martini actions

I saw the Martini in 22 Squirrel that Jingweed has for sale in the classifieds and was wondering what Martini actions sell for in the US and how available they are.

I know of plenty of rimfire actions that have been converted to centrefire, and while I haven't compared the 310 Cadet action to the rimfire action I believe the rimfire action has thicker receiver sidewalls than the Cadet.

So how sought after are the small frame Martini actions in the US, how hard are they to come by, and what is the value of them?

Kiwi
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  #2  
Old 02-03-2020, 12:58 AM
L Rivard L Rivard is offline
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Default Cadet actions

Separate Martini actions are pretty rare this side of the pond. I scored one from a gunsmith's estate many years ago for $250 and it is now my favorite ground squirrel piece in .222 Rem. You see the whole rifles at gun shows now and then in various states of repair for asking prices of $700 to $1000. I've never actually seen one sell. Well done varmint conversions sell well at $700 to $1200 or so. Hope that helps.
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Old 02-03-2020, 02:37 AM
SEM SEM is offline
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I have in what appears to be all original condition and very functional 310 Cadet take down, cant say what I paid for it, I see Martinis every now and then, guess I should grab them?
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Old 02-03-2020, 12:26 PM
Double D Double D is offline
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Martini Small actions are around if you know where to look...like my safe.

They show up quite frequently on the gun auction sites. There are a couple on Gunbroker right now.

Seems a shame to break up a .310 Cadet these days. They are fun to shoot and are getting to be fewer and fewer.

The later rimfires, Model 12's and such make good donors. The last guns I built were 17HM2 and 17 HMR. Simple process of installing a 17 cal liner and recutting the extractor for the HMR.

I have been think about thinning the herd a bit and keep reaching in, pulling out, looking over, and putting back. I have a couple half done gunsmith projects that I bought off customers for my work in retirement. Those will probably be offered up pretty soon.Well retirement is here and the arthritis in my hands makes it difficult to do the work. And the need seems to be gone since moving from Montana. Haven't found a handy population of varmints around here-yet. Thinking may-haps that .218 Mashburn bee, might go.
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  #5  
Old 02-03-2020, 12:48 PM
Double D Double D is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEM View Post
I have in what appears to be all original condition and very functional 310 Cadet take down, cant say what I paid for it, I see Martinis every now and then, guess I should grab them?
A .310 Cadet in take-down? Really? Do you mean a BSA Francotte Martini in .310 Cadet caliber with a full stock as issued to Cadets? Or do you mean A BSA Francotte Martini in .22 cal. Target stocks, target barrel and target sights

The Model 4's .310 Cadets weren't take downs. Later Model 6's and its variations Models 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 may have been takedowns in .310 caliber. These 6' and later version in centerfires sell at a premium, and unless already modified should not be converted.

Later Model 12's and beyond were all .22. An all complete in clean original condition Model 12 should be left as is. Later 1215's with the pistol gripstock make good heavy platform as for building. Sadly the British had these as club guns and the stocks are riddled with holes for sling and handstops. Finish is often wore away to bare metal or more often just abused. These gun make good candidates for conversion.
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  #6  
Old 02-03-2020, 04:43 PM
SEM SEM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double D View Post
A .310 Cadet in take-down? Really? Do you mean a BSA Francotte Martini in .310 Cadet caliber with a full stock as issued to Cadets? Or do you mean A BSA Francotte Martini in .22 cal. Target stocks, target barrel and target sights

The Model 4's .310 Cadets weren't take downs. Later Model 6's and its variations Models 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 may have been takedowns in .310 caliber. These 6' and later version in centerfires sell at a premium, and unless already modified should not be converted.

Later Model 12's and beyond were all .22. An all complete in clean original condition Model 12 should be left as is. Later 1215's with the pistol gripstock make good heavy platform as for building. Sadly the British had these as club guns and the stocks are riddled with holes for sling and handstops. Finish is often wore away to bare metal or more often just abused. These gun make good candidates for conversion.
Double D, That is the information I was given when I bought it I did not feel they knew all that much and really did not feel the need to investigate it, I just like it for what it is and how it shoots. Pretty much a single shot only kind of guy

But now with your knowledge maybe I will know what it is I have, The nomenclature is limited to WW. GREENER BIRMINGHAM SHARPSHOOTERS CLUB AMMUNITION 310 and the serial # in 3 places
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  #7  
Old 02-03-2020, 06:55 PM
mulepasture mulepasture is offline
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Default Mashburn Bee....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Double D View Post
Martini Small actions are around if you know where to look...like my safe.

They show up quite frequently on the gun auction sites. There are a couple on Gunbroker right now.

Seems a shame to break up a .310 Cadet these days. They are fun to shoot and are getting to be fewer and fewer.

The later rimfires, Model 12's and such make good donors. The last guns I built were 17HM2 and 17 HMR. Simple process of installing a 17 cal liner and recutting the extractor for the HMR.

I have been think about thinning the herd a bit and keep reaching in, pulling out, looking over, and putting back. I have a couple half done gunsmith projects that I bought off customers for my work in retirement. Those will probably be offered up pretty soon.Well retirement is here and the arthritis in my hands makes it difficult to do the work. And the need seems to be gone since moving from Montana. Haven't found a handy population of varmints around here-yet. Thinking may-haps that .218 Mashburn bee, might go.
Now that you are somewhat of an Oklahoman by transplant..a Mashburn Bee would line right up with your new State of residence...As if you needed a reason...Lol
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  #8  
Old 02-03-2020, 07:19 PM
Double D Double D is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEM View Post
Double D, That is the information I was given when I bought it I did not feel they knew all that much and really did not feel the need to investigate it, I just like it for what it is and how it shoots. Pretty much a single shot only kind of guy

But now with your knowledge maybe I will know what it is I have, The nomenclature is limited to WW. GREENER BIRMINGHAM SHARPSHOOTERS CLUB AMMUNITION 310 and the serial # in 3 places
Oh wow, you have something else entirely, post some pictures? I hope you have kept it all original.
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  #9  
Old 02-03-2020, 09:37 PM
Double D Double D is offline
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From the Greener Story,

" Sharpshooter Club Rifles

"These were the first club rifle made from 1900, in .310 calibre and several variants were produced. This was the least expensive rifle produced and was designed both for target practice and match shooting."

Variants listed.

Mark I fixed 30 inch barrel
Mark II shaped fore end for better grip, 26 inch detachable barrel
Sharpshooters Cadet rifle with military pattern fixed barrel and long fore end.
Miniature Cadet Rifle in 297/230 bore.

What we call a take down barrel is generally call a detachable barrel and its purpose was for cleaning. Secondary was to detach for carrying in a box or case.
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  #10  
Old 02-03-2020, 10:47 PM
Brake Man Brake Man is offline
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I have a full size Martini that was converted to 22 rf by C.G. Bonehill. Wood is really nice. Don't know who did it. Last owners father was exceptional woodworker and may have restocked it. Wish I could find a cadet in any condition.
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